Navy Veteran Awarded $32 Million in Asbestos Case

Ronald Dummitt, a former U.S. Navy boiler tender, was awarded the money as the jury decided that companies had failed to warn the man about the dangers of asbestos exposure. A trial that took more than eight weeks in New York was settled recently as a Kentucky resident was awarded more than $32 million in an asbestos lawsuit, according to WSAZ 3 Charleston.

Ronald Dummitt, a former U.S. Navy boiler tender, was awarded the money as the jury decided that companies had failed to warn the man about the dangers of asbestos exposure. A total of $16 million was awarded for past pain and suffering, while the same amount was given for the future pain and suffering that may arise, reported the news source.

The alleged asbestos exposure that Dummitt had experienced occurred while he was on different naval ships over an 18-year period. While working in the boiler room of these vessels between 1960 and 1977, the young sailor was allegedly exposed to several different forms of the harmful chemical, WSAZ 3 reported.

Though the incidents had occurred on U.S. Naval vessels, Crane Manufacturing Company was the responsible party, as it had allegedly installed the asbestos-laden valves on a series of ships during this time. Dummitt’s work on these products allegedly led to his contraction of malignant mesothelioma, according to the news source.

Malignant mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that attacks the tissues surrounding most of the body’s internal organs. According to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 2,500 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma each year.

Another asbestos-related lawsuit was settled recently, as the City of Beliot, Wisconsin, agreed to pay $270,000 in an effort to settle a case concerning harmful chemicals, according to the Appleton Post Crescent.

Dan Langone sued the city in 2009 after he claimed that the local government had failed to address asbestos problems in the property that his company had purchased in 1998. He had filed paperwork that was geared towards getting inspectors to clean out the harmful materials that were inside the property, reported the news source.

After the city received the paperwork, it sent over cleaners to remove the harmful materials, and Langone found the asbestos inside following the inspection that had allegedly failed to find all of the material, the lawsuit claimed.

The city agreed to pay the money due to the asbestos that was allegedly found on the property, and out of an effort to avoid further litigation, the news source reported.