Distracted Driving Factor in Projected 10 Percent Jump in 2015 Pedestrian Fatalities

The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) has issued a new report projecting a 10 percent rise in 2015 pedestrian fatalities versus the prior year. Projections are based on 2015 pedestrian fatality trends as reported by all 50 state highway safety agencies and the District of Columbia.

Never in the history of the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, which was instituted in 1975, has a double-digit increase in pedestrian fatalities occurred from one year to the next. In many years the number of fatalities has decreased, and the previous maximum year-to-year increase in fatalities was 8.1 percent.

Numerous reasons are likely culprits for the unprecedented rise in pedestrian fatalities. Distracting driving, including texting and driving, is taking drivers’ eyes off the road. Likewise, distracted walking is also contributing to the fatalities rise as pedestrians aren’t aware of their surroundings or ready to react when they eyes are fixated on a mobile device.

Other factors that may contribute to the rise in pedestrian fatalities include continually safer vehicles that protect drivers but not pedestrians, more pedestrians walking outdoors for exercise, and the lowest gas prices in the past decade leading to more vehicles on the road.

The GHSA continues to work toward improving pedestrian safety, such as the recently passed and instituted federal surface transportation bill, the FAST Act, that empowers states with additional resources.

Goldberg & Osborne is helping spread awareness about the dangers of distracted driving through the Goldberg & Osborne Don’t Text and Drive Scholarship.

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22 Car Accident Help Suggestions: Before, During and After

No one wakes up wondering if today is the day their life will be turned upside down due to a car accident. However, becoming an auto accident victim is an unfortunate reality of many lives that strikes when least expected. The ensuing emotional distress, potential minor or serious injuries, and numerous repercussions can be overwhelming to deal with if you’re not informed and somewhat ready before the accident occurs.

Car accident help techniques can be applied preemptively, during and after an accident to greatly reduce the stress of the situation, help prevent further injury to yourself or others, assist with local authorities, and prepare for a potential legal battle that may lie ahead.

We have put together a comprehensive list of 22 car accident help suggestions in a nifty chronologically-ordered guide that covers accident preparedness through how to mentally cope with car accident injuries after you’re home or recovering in a hospital.

Before an Accident
During an Accident
After an Accident

Emergency Accident Kit For Your Vehicle

Whether your vehicle happens to blow a tire and skid out in the deep wilderness at night or gets hit by a bus in rush hour city traffic, it’s always a wise idea to have an emergency kit right there and ready for immediate use.

These are some great items to include in a personalized vehicle emergency kit that will come in handy regardless of the accident’s severity. Some items might seem obvious but you can never be too careful during preparation to ensure all bases are covered.

  • Cell phone with camera and voice recording function (if you don’t normally carry one)
  • Disposable backup camera
  • Car insurance card
  • Medical information card noting special health conditions and insurance carrier/number
  • All emergency contacts including family, friends, doctor and desired injury lawyer
  • Pen/pencil and paper to write on
  • First aid kit
  • Roadside flares
  • Small cones
  • Small, powerful LED flashlight
  • Water bottles (switched out bimonthly) or insulated drinking containers
  • Snacks like peanuts
  • At least one blanket and towel
  • Hat/gloves/change of clothes if you travel in cold weather areas
  • Spare tire

It is highly recommended to keep a physical copy of all information in case a cell phone is damaged during the accident and rendered useless. We also recommend against the prepackaged accident preparedness kits as they are typically overpriced and won’t ever contain everything you need. Purchasing your own items, much like shopping for school supplies, is the best way to go.

GPS on Phone or Separate Device

Imagine being in an accident and needing immediate medical attention but not knowing exactly where you are due to either a remote area or concussion symptoms. Wouldn’t it be nice to look at your phone and know immediately where you’re located?

Most iPhones and Android phones come with a prepackaged mapping app. If for some reason you can’t find one on your phone then make sure to get one installed as soon as possible.

Emergency Contacts Easily Accessible on Phone

People don’t generally regularly call their doctor, lawyer or insurance company to shoot the breeze so those numbers might not be easily accessible on your phone. You can save yourself a lot of headache and hassle by making sure 911 and the local police, immediate and secondary family emergency contacts, doctors, a local accident lawyer whether you are a client or not, AAA if you’re a customer, and your insurance company are quickly accessible in your phone’s contacts to offer car accident help and guidance with a single button push.

Understand Your Vehicle and Health Insurance

Many of us are guilty for buying vehicle and health insurance because we legally have to and never take the time to fully understand our coverage. If you’re in an accident and need car accident help, knowing your coverage ahead of time without having to figure out it on top of the emotional stress of an accident is hugely beneficial.

Insurance companies are notorious for presenting your coverage in the equivalent of a short novel. Spend an hour to pluck out the important information you might need such as:

  • Deductibles for health coverage
  • Emergency room, ambulance, tow truck, and out-of-network costs
  • Rental car coverage

Stay Put and Remain Calm

You’ve just been in an automobile or truck accident and are probably in immediate shock as a result. Unless you and your vehicle are literally on fire, do not under any other circumstance exit the vehicle and try your best to remain calm while you assess the situation.

First and foremost your accident will impact vehicles in the immediate vicinity. You see it in the news every now and then; someone gets out of their car after an accident or a good samaritan comes to help and one or both individuals get hit by a car speeding by wasn’t paying attention to the road.

You could also have an injury that will worsen with movement, injure yourself trying to force open a damaged door or window, or injure someone else who sees you struggling to exit and tries to offer assistance.

Move Your Vehicle if Operable

If your vehicle is still operable then it’s a good idea to maneuver it out of traffic lanes and off to the side of the road as long as there is a clear and safe path to do so. This will lessen the probability of another car or truck barreling down the road from slamming into it if they were distracted and not paying attention.

Call The Police and 911

Now that you’re still in your vehicle and calming down a little, it’s time to call the Police and 911. Ask someone else in the vehicle or the first person to arrive at the vehicle to place the call for you if you are unable to make the call due to injury or phone inaccessibility/damage.

Make sure you or whoever is on the phone with the police remains on the line until they arrive at the scene or until the 911 or police operator instructs you to hang up.

Do Not Admit Accident Fault

You may come face-to-face with the other vehicle driver(s) involved in the accident and get engaged in a conversation. Regardless of whether you feel you were at fault in the accident, do not under any circumstance admit fault for the accident to the other driver(s) or authorities. Fault discussion is best left for your attorney.

Exchange Insurance Information

If you followed the emergency kit for your vehicle directions then you’ll have your car insurance information handy. Swap this information with the other driver(s) making sure to get the following back in return:

  • Driver name(s), address and phone number
  • Car(s) make/model/year/license plate number
  • Insurance company and policy number

Talk to Witness(es)

Oftentimes one or more third parties witnessed the accident. You never know when a witness statement or testimony might be needed so it’s best to get their name and phone number at minimum, either using your pen and paper or phone, in case you need to pass the information along to your attorney.

Do Not Talk About Your Injuries

What you say about your injuries at the accident scene to anyone could come back to hurt you in the wallet later on if you underestimate the injuries. If someone asks you how you’re doing or if you’re hurt, stick with vague responses like, “I’m not sure” rather than offering any specifics.

Obviously if the paramedics are helping you at the car accident scene and ask you where you hurt, you tell them! Do not try to self-diagnose yourself; let the professionals do their job.

Car Accident Help Scene

Photograph the Accident Scene

Use your cell phone or backup disposable camera to take extensive pictures and video of the accident scene. These pictures should include the following at minimum:

  • Damage and positioning of your vehicle and the other vehicles
  • Terrain immediately before the accident including skid marks
  • Multiple angles of the accident scene

Remove Personal Belongings From Your Vehicle

If you’re physically able and it’s safe to do so after the accident scene has been secured and the vehicle is still safe to enter, you should remove all your personal belongings from your vehicle. Other people you don’t know will have access to the vehicle once the tow truck hauls it off so it’s best not to invite theft by leaving valuables laying around.

Collect Your Thoughts — Alone

At some point during the accident scene chaos, after you’ve gone through the necessities, take a few moments to stand or sit by yourself and collect your thoughts. Healing Trauma recommends a series of exercises where you rotate between focusing on the first feeling or sensation in your body and them shift that focus to the exact opposite feeling in your body over and over again. This act of Pendulation will help discharge the nervous energy.

If the injuries are so severe that you’re physically or mentally unable to do this at the scene, practice it later when you’re alone and able to do so.

Call Your Doctor

Oftentimes back and neck pain stemming from a car accident don’t show up until several hours or even a day or more after the accident. For both your personal well-being and potential lawsuit, have your doctor check you out as soon as possible after the accident. Your lawyer will need a detailed diagnosis of injuries as part of the evaluation process of your potential injury claim.

Call Your Lawyer

It’s best to err on the side of caution and contact your lawyer as you’re physically able to do so and especially before talking to the insurance company. Your lawyer shouldn’t charge you for initial advice on how to proceed with a potential injury claim and will help you spell out your options, next steps, and help define expectations.

Call Your Insurance Company

You will want to report the accident to your insurance company after you’ve talked to your lawyer. Don’t deliberately avoid getting insurance involved because the damage to your vehicle looks minor to the eye. You have no idea what nightmares are brewing under the body like a bent frame or expensive damaged parts. The former often results in a total loss of the vehicle.

Do Not Talk to Other Driver’s Insurance Company

You may get a phone call from the other driver or drivers’ insurance company inquiring about the accident. You are under no obligation to speak to them and are advised to politely decline the conversation. They are working for the other party or parties, not you.

Document Medical Treatment, Lost Wages and Distress

Your attorney will need to see documentation for all your doctor visits, medication, and wages lost as a result of any car accident injuries. If you choose to file suit then it will be a lot easier to produce documentation, such as a diary, of this information rather than trying to recreate it from receipts or memory.

If you intend to file suit for distress then also document in a journal or other medium every time the injuries impact your normal way of life.

Take Care of Yourself

Different people will experience a varied range of emotions in the hours, days, weeks and even months following an injury accident. One of the worst things you can do is cope by falling into bad habits. Use this unfortunate circumstance as a change for good by balancing your diet and regularly exercising if physically able to do so.

Seek Support From Friends and Family

It is a lot easier to get through a traumatic injury and subsequent physical healing with the support of friends and family. You may feel like being alone most of the time to deal with guilt, but you’d also be amazed how powerful being around those that care for you can be to your mental well-being during difficult times.

Be Patient

Being patient and hoping for the pain, suffering, and inconvenience of a car accident to wash away for good is easier said than done, right? Absolutely. However, knowing beforehand that the healing and legal process can take weeks, months, and sometimes longer depending on the accident and injury severity can mentally help prepare you for the aftermath of an injury accident.

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NCAA Reaches Preliminary Settlement on Head Injury Case

The NCAA has reached a preliminary settlement in a class action suit with victims of traumatic head injuries during college sports games. The lawsuit was brought against the organization by former college athletes who wanted the NCAA to institute significant reforms on its head-injury policies.

The settlement indicates a big change in the care and safety of both male and female college athletes in all sports and across all divisions. The settlement will not only apply to former athletes, but also current players and those that play in the future. This settlement issued a new national protocol on how to treat head injuries sustained by players during games and practices. Athletes will no longer be allowed to continue playing after a head injury until a full workup has been conducted, and the player has been declared concussion symptom-free.

Concussions will be taken more seriously by coaches and trainers. Medical personnel will be required to attend at all sporting events. Other precautions have been specifically laid out, and all college teams will be required to comply.

According to the lead plaintiffs’ lawyer, Steve Berman, the preliminary offer will be good for the players. “This offers college athletes another level of protection, which is vitally important to their health. Student-athletes – not just football players – have dropped out of school and suffered huge long-term symptoms because of brain injuries. Anything we can do to enhance concussion management is a very important day for student-athletes,” stated Berman.

Financial Compensation for Athletes That Suffer Head Injuries

The preliminary settlement also establishes a $70 million medical monitoring fund to treat injuries that occur during college sports competitions. This fund would give all former college athletes a chance to receive a neurological screening to examine brain function and get diagnostic support for any potential problems. It would also have doctors look for any signs of brain damage.

While this money would be a much-needed step in the right direction, many still say that this does not do enough to compensate athletes who receive brain damage, because the fund is only used for diagnostic purposes. If damage is found, victims will have to pay for treatment on their own.

The settlement does leave open the possibility to sue for damages in individual cases, but some lawyers worry that this will not be a realistic option. “It’s going to be tough to find a lawyer to fight against the NCAA’s machinery when you’re talking about only $20,000 in damages. This is going to snuff out the vast majority of claims,” says Jay Edelson, a lawyer involved in the suit representing one of the plaintiffs.

Still, the majority of people are cautiously optimistic that this settlement will make significant strides towards protecting athletes, as was the original goal of the class action. All that is left now is to wait and see what the final settlement offer will contain.

Source:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/30/sports/ncaa-settlement-overhauls-head-injury-policies.html?ref=health&_r=0

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NHTSA Investigating Steering Defect in Ford Sedans

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has launched a preliminary investigation into safety issues related to the steering systems of Ford sedans. The issue was raised after concerns over safety issues regarding steering shafts on about 500,000 Ford vehicles.

Ford Crown Victoria, Grand Marquis, and Marauder sedans from model years 2004 through 2007 may be affected by these steering issues. The steering problems are related to degrading heat shields on these Fords. According to NHSTA, the heat shields may rust and impede proper steering as time passes. NHTSA was made aware of the issue after five customer complaints were submitted about steering concerns.

So far, there is no formal recall, but one may be issued if the investigation determines that this problem is a wide concern. Ford has thus far said that it will cooperate with NHTSA investigation and has declined further comment.

Rust Problems with Ford Sedans

The inciting incident for this investigation occurred in April, 2014. A 2004 Crown Victoria rolled over after the steering locked. The resulting accident in the Detroit area caused neck and lower back injuries to the driver. According to the driver, the heat shield was found underneath the car after the accident, and it had apparently rusted off. The problem was attributed to salt corrosion.

In the other complaints received by NHTSA, drivers stated that steering had become very difficult to control, to the point that “bodily force” was required to turn the steering wheel. These problems may also be attributed to rusting problems.

In the agency’s official announcement of the preliminary investigation, NHTSA voiced worries over a “separation of the lower steering column shaft from the upper steering column shaft resulting in a loss of steering control.” The investigation will look into how big of a problem this may be, and if the defect is attributable to design flaws or simple wear and tear in less than optimal conditions.

This is not the first rust-related problem reported for these vehicles. Over 300,000 Crown Victoria and Grand Marquis sedans were recalled in August 2013 in states where salt was heavily used on roads. A defect in these vehicles could corrode the lower intermediate shaft. This eventually could cause a collapse of the upper intermediate steering shaft at a serious risk to the driver. This recall was a result of another NHTSA investigation sparked by 22 customer complaints to the agency.

NHTSA is now conducting an independent engineering analysis to determine if there is a harmful defect. In several months, NHTSA should make recommendations based on the outcome of the analysis or possibly issue a recall.

Source:

http://www.latimes.com/business/autos/la-fi-hy-nhtsa-investigating-ford-steering-defect-20140715-story.html?track=rss&cid=dlvr.it&dlvrit=52116

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The Dangers of Gas Cans

Almost every home has gas cans. We keep them in our garages and sheds to fill up lawnmowers and other devices. These red, plastic canisters are about as ubiquitous as any other home accessory. For this reason, we never really think about the dangers posed by them.

Investigation has revealed many examples of horrific accidents related to children knocking over gas cans with tricycles, fathers filling up chainsaws or lawnmowers, or people just walking by a can that explodes. Just a small spark from static electricity or a water heater’s pilot light can cause the gas can to combust.

Blitz USA Defective Gas Cans

About 95% of all gas cans sold in the United States are made of plastic. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, about 19 million gas cans are purchased by consumers every year. About 75% of these plastic cans bought in the United States are sold by Blitz USA. The company chose not to use flame arresters in its design of plastic gas cans, which makes their cans especially prone to explosions as time passes.

Flame arresters have been used in metal gas cans for 100 years and they have effectively prevented explosions. Blitz USA even used them on their own metal gas cans. However, they chose not to include the simple metal device in their cheaper plastic models. Many plastic bottles containing flammable liquids and gases already include flame arresters, including lighter fluid. Although including flame arresters would minimally increase the cost of manufacturing the gas cans, the tiny cost is well worth the investment in safety.

Flame arresters are standard in most industries. In fact, workplace standard 1926.155(l) on fire protection and prevention from the Occupational Safety and Health Care Administration requires that all gas cans have flame arresters. The same standards of protection should be applied to consumers who have gas cans in their homes.

While Blitz has recently gone out of business, its successors, including Kinderhook, should be held to the highest standards. Safety should be the number one concern when it comes to manufacturing products that can be so dangerous. Legislation requiring flame arresters on every gas can is a top priority for consumer advocacy groups for the upcoming legislative session.

Source:

http://www.takejusticeback.com/node/60

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